‘Soon on your holidays’: ISIS fanatics call for attacks on Christmas markets in chilling posters containing images of Santa Claus kneeling with his hands tied in front of a jihadist

 

  • The images have ‘Soon on your holidays’ written in English, French and German
  • Images circulated on messaging app by supporters of the Islamic State 
  • German police say they have uncovered an ISIS plot to attack markets
  • Foreign Office is warning Britons travelling to Christmas markets to be vigilant 

 

Isis fanatics have  issued chilling threat to attack Christmas markets in the Britain, France and Germany in pictures circulated among supporters.

The jihadis have circulated images on messaging apps including one in which a black-clad hooded figure is seen standing over a kneeling Santa Claus with an image of Regent Street in the background.

A message in English, French, and German says ‘Soon on your holidays’ with the clear implication that London can expect a terrorist attack over the holiday season.

The images were intercepted on message apps used by supporters of the Islamic State 

The images were intercepted on message apps used by supporters of the Islamic State

The chat group is called Army of Mujahideen and images appear to be designed by a user called Dr Almani.

The chat group is called Army of Mujahideen and images appear to be designed by a user called Dr Almani.

And pro-ISIS media group also circulated images of a jihadi and a wolf standing over a burning Vatican.

An accompanying message, with no punctuation, on the latter said: ‘Their convoys will crowd itself in front of you prepare and plan for them show them the meaning of terrorism kill them and do not hold back with your blood the reward is paradise and let them know that you are from an ummah [Muslim community] where mountains bow down to we will not forget our revenge for every drop of blood that they have shed we will not exclude the young, elderly or women you are all in the crosshairs of our arrows and what is about to come is more even worse’.

Their bombardment on the centre of Catholocism has been a recent theme – a photo depicting Pope Francis being beheaded was shared last week.

According to the company, it was the first time they had seen this particular image and it was posted at 12:27 p.m., UK time, according to the time on a screengrab showing the chat feed.

The image is from a chat group called Army of Mujahideen and appears to be designed by a user called Dr Almani.

Another image shows a blood soaked hand gripping a knife, Photoshopped onto a poster for Paris Christmas markets, which has the Eiffel Tower in the background.

German police have arrested six alleged ISIS plotters amid fears they were planning to launch a 'coordinated attack' on a Christmas market (file picture)

German police have arrested six alleged ISIS plotters amid fears they were planning to launch a ‘coordinated attack’ on a Christmas market (file picture)

In December last year, 12 were murdered when an ISIS fanatic ploughed a lorry through Berlin's Breitscheidplatz Christmas market

In December last year, 12 were murdered when an ISIS fanatic ploughed a lorry through Berlin’s Breitscheidplatz Christmas market

The emergence of the images comes after German police arrested six alleged ISIS plotters amid fears they were planning an attack on a Christmas market on the anniversary of last year’s atrocity in Berlin.

The Syrian men were arrested during raids involving 500 officers in the towns of Kassel, Hannover, Essen and Leipzig.

Prosecutors say they were plotting a co-ordinated attack using ‘weapons and explosives’.

There are reports the target may have been a Christmas market in the north western town of Essen on December 19, but this has not been confirmed by authorities.

On the same date last year, Tunisian ISIS fanatic Anis Amri hijacked a truck to murder 12 revellers at the packed Breitscheidplatz Christmas market.

The Foreign Office has issued advice for travellers planning attend the seasonal events across Europe this year.

It says: ‘There may be increased security in place over the Christmas and New Year period, including at Christmas markets and other major events that might attract large crowds. You should be vigilant and follow the advice of local authorities.’